Monthly Archives: January 2010

A Simple Way To Automatically Add New Blog Posts to Your FaceBook Pages

I spend a fair amount of time writing blog posts, and I’d like to get as much mileage out of that content as possible. At the same time, I want to keep adding new content to my FaceBook Fan page… but there are only 24 hours in the day.

Something’s got to give.

Or does it?

How would you like to have a short excerpt from each new blog post added automatically to your FaceBook profile? There is a WordPress plugin called “WordBooker” that will do just that.

In this short tutorial, I’ll show you how to find the plugin, add it to your blog, and configure it so that FaceBook’s security settings allow it to write to your FaceBook page and WordPress allows Facebook comments to be automatically posted back to your blog.

It’s a great way to get new readers for your blog while adding fresh content to FaceBook.


This text will be replaced


After inatalling the plugin, if you receive the error message that Wordbooker lacks permission to publish to fan pages, use the following URL which will give you a dialogue box where you can grant permissions.

http://www.facebook.com/connect/prompt_permissions.php?api_key=0cbf13c858237f5d74ef0c32a4db11fd&v=1.0&ext_perm=publish_stream&enable_profile_selector=1

The Sale You Didn’t Know You Lost

a roll of money rests on a table

Are you leaving money on the table?

It’s bad enough when you know you lost a sale. At least then you can take whatever steps are necessary to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

But what about the sale you didn’t know you lost?

Must your customers jump through hoops before they reach your shopping cart? Do you offer them the payment choices they want instead of just the one that is convenient for you?

Is there a third party vendor standing between you and your customer who is costing you sales?

Consider this story:

I was ready to buy a piece of software for this blog. It is reasonably priced; it works as promised; and I can see lots of uses for it.

I wanted to buy it before the close of 2009, for tax purposes. I went to the developer’s site, credit card in hand, ready to click the buy button.

But PayPal got in the way.

PayPal will only let you pay by credit card if your PayPal account is empty. I was expecting a recurring fee to be charged to my PayPal account the next day, so there was a small balance.

I tried three different times to pay by credit card – but PayPal insisted on using the small amount in my PayPal account and charging the rest to my credit card. For reasons irrelevant to this discussion, I was neither willing to split the charge nor empty the account.

So the sale was lost.

You could say this was through no fault of the product developer – after all, it was PayPal’s policies that got in the way. But all the developer had to do was offer an alternative payment method, such as Google Check Out, to make the sale.

Don’t leave money on the table. Resolve that in 2010, your customers will never leave empty handed when you could have sold them exactly what they wanted.

Are Things Harder Than They Need To Be?

cannot see over the wall

Stopped By The Barrier

No matter how fast you run or how hard you work, when you run into a wall, you are stymied.

Sometimes you can only peer over the wall, wondering why everyone else seems to be getting ahead.

Sometimes you just bang your head into the wall until you give up.

The wrong tools turn a simple job into an endless chore.

Installing and updating WordPress should be insanely easy these days.

If your web hosting comapny makes it hard – find another web host.

Annual hosting plans from companies like BlueHost or HostGator offer everything from unlimited domain accounts to one click installs for applications like WordPress or Simple Machine Forums – for less than $100.00.

Your time is worth money – and saving $2.00 or $3.00 a month is no savings at all when your website doesn’t perform correctly.

Here’s a checklist. If you answer no to any of these questions, your life is harder than it needs to be.

  • Can you install the latest version of WordPress with a simple mouse click?
  • Can you update WordPress from within your blog with a single click?
  • Can you browse, install, and activate plugins and themes without ever leaving your Admin panel?
  • Can you keep your web site, plugins, and themes patched and up  to date easily?
  • Can you host multiple web sites and blogs, each with its own domain name, on a single account for less than $10.00 per month?

On the other hand, if you answer “Yes”  to these questions, your web site needs upgrading:

  • Are you charged over bandwidth limit fees?
  • Are you running out of space for video or audio files?
  • Do you have to enter an FTP password and configure FTP settings if you try to use WordPress’s plugin or theme updater?
  • Is updating plugins such a hassle that you are afraid to even try the new WordPress version upgrade?

I use and recommend BlueHost orHostGator (and I earn a small commision if you buy a plan after clicking on these links), but there are other good, inexpensive web hosts as well.

Any time you spend reviewing hosting options for the new year will be time well spent.

Don’t struggle with your site unnecessarily. Make it a New Year’s Resolution to spend your time creating content – not struggling with outdated service providers. Once you see how easy it can be, you’ll never agree to run an obstacle course again.

Photo by Giuseppe Bognanni Released under Creative Commons License